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The complete guide to rendering submission content

So, you want to show the content of a submission hey? This guide covers all the different ways to output content, along with some fundamentals on field layouts.

Josh Crawford Josh Crawford Aug 2022

Both Form and Submission objects are Craft Elements (opens new window), meaning that they both can have custom fields defined on them and stored in a FieldLayout (opens new window). This is the same mechanism that Craft uses for entry sections, category groups, global sets, etc.

The difference with Formie is that we introduce the concept of pages and rows which group the fields. Forms are where you define the fields for a form (hence the fields for a field layout) which are the same a Submission uses.

The reason for that preamble is the steps we go through in this guide about field layouts are very similar to other Craft instances, like sections. As such, you'll be able to put into practice what you learn here in other areas!

Getting to know field layouts#

As we've mentioned — a field layout consists of several tabs, which in turn consists of several fields. In Formie a field layout tab is re-purposed as a page (a form has multiple pages, which has multiple rows, which has multiple fields).

You can fetch the field layout for a Submission with the following:

{% set fieldLayout = submission.getFieldLayout() %}

From there, you can either loop through the pages, rows, and fields in the field layout, or loop through the fields.

{% set fieldLayout = submission.getFieldLayout() %}

{# Loop through each page, then row, then field #}
{% for page in fieldLayout.getPages() %}
    {% for row in page.getRows() %}
        {% for field in row.fields %}
            {{ field.name }}
        {% endfor %}
    {% endfor %}
{% endfor %}

{# Loop through each field #}
{% for field in fieldLayout.getCustomFields() %}
    {{ field.name }}
{% endfor %}

Getting field values#

Now that we've got a handle on getting the fields defined in the field layout for a submission, we'll want to get the content for the field. This is a little challenging, as not every field is created equally!

Take for example a Single-Line Text field and a Checkboxes field. The value of a Single-Line Text field might be something like I'm interested in your product, which is simple text. Checkboxes however have multiple values that users can pick, and their value is stored as an array ['Option A', 'Option C'].

Before we get too ahead of ourselves, let's start with getting the raw value from the submission from a field.

{% for field in fieldLayout.getCustomFields() %}
    {% set value = submission.getFieldValue(field.handle) %}
{% endfor %}

This is the same for any other element in Craft, including entries, categories and users — anything that uses custom fields, this is how you can get the custom field value from an element.

The value of value will vary widely depending on the type of field that it is. It could be a string, a number, an array or even an object.

Now that we have our value, we've got options on how to display it. Fortunately, we have a few helpers to help (😏) you out.

As a string#

The most common approach is to show the value as a string. Even if the value for the field is something more complex, like an array or object, Formie will convert it to a string. If the value was an array, it would be comma-delimited, or if an object cast as a string.

{% set value = submission.getFieldValue(field.handle) %}

{{ field.getValueAsString(value, submission) }}

Easy! But we might also like to cater for some of the advanced fields like sub-field enabled (Address, multi-Name), and nested-field (Repeater, Group). Maybe you want to treat the sub/nested fields differently, rather than comma-delimit them?

{# For any sub-field fields, loop through all the sub-fields and show their individual values #}
{% if field.hasSubfields() %}
    {% for subField in field.getSubfieldOptions() %}
        <p>
            <strong>{{ field.name }}: {{ subField.label }}</strong><br>

            {{ field.getValueAsString(value[subField.handle], submission) }}
        </p><br>
    {% endfor %}
{% endif %}

{# For any nesting fields, loop through all the nested fields and show their individual values #}
{# Don't forget to handle nested, sub-fields — oof! #}
{% if field.hasNestedFields() %}
    {% for row in value.all() %}
        {% set rowIndex = loop.index %}

        {% for nestedField in row.getFieldLayout().getCustomFields() %}
            {% set subValue = row.getFieldValue(nestedField.handle) %}

            <p>
                <strong>{{ field.name }}: Row {{ rowIndex }}: {{ nestedField.name }}</strong><br>

                {{ nestedField.getValueAsString(subValue, row) }}
            </p><br>

            {% if nestedField.hasSubfields() %}
                {% for nestedSubField in nestedField.getSubfieldOptions() %}
                    <p>
                        <strong>{{ field.name }}: Row {{ rowIndex }}: {{ nestedField.name }}: {{ nestedSubField.label }}</strong><br>
                        {{ nestedField.getValueAsString(subValue[nestedSubField.handle], row) }}
                    </p><br>
                {% endfor %}
            {% endif %}
        {% endfor %}
    {% endfor %}
{% endif %}

The above is a bit lengthy, but purely optional depending on your use case.

Lastly, we'll also want to check if the field is "cosmetic" — as in a field that doesn't have a value, and is purely for display, like a HTML, Section or similar field.

To finish up the basics of displaying content as strings, here's it all put together (in its basic form).

{# Get the submission #}
{% set submission = craft.formie.submissions.id(1234).one() %}

{# Loop through each field in the field layout #}
{% for field in submission.getFieldLayout().getCustomFields() %}
    {% if not field.getIsCosmetic() %}
        {# Get the raw value for the field, from the submission #}
        {% set value = submission.getFieldValue(field.handle) %}

        <strong>{{ field.name }}</strong><br>
        {{ field.getValueAsString(value, submission) }}
    {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

As a JSON array#

Another approach is to fetch values as JSON, which will return an array or object if the value for a field is complex. Any primitive values like a string, number, etc will not be converted into an object.

To illustrate, let's look at some examples for different field types.

{# Get the submission #}
{% set submission = craft.formie.submissions.id(1234).one() %}

{# Loop through each field in the field layout #}
{% for field in submission.getFieldLayout().getCustomFields() %}
    {% if not field.getIsCosmetic() %}
        {# Get the raw value for the field, from the submission #}
        {% set value = submission.getFieldValue(field.handle) %}

        <strong>{{ field.name }}</strong><br>
        {{ field.getValueAsJson(value, submission) | json_encode }}
    {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

Single-Line Text: "Some text"

Checkboxes: [{"label": "Option 2 Label", "value": "Option 2 Value"}, {"label": "Option 3 Label", "value": "Option 3 Value"}]

Multi Name: {"firstName": "Peter", "lastName": "Sherman", "isMultiple": true}

Phone Number: {"number": "673476578", "country": null, "hasCountryCode": false}

For Summary field#

Another method you can employ is to get the value of the field, as used by the Summary field. If you're not familiar with this field, it allows you to place it within a form, and it'll show a summary of the content of the submission so far. Very useful to place it on the last page of a form for users to review their submission.

{# Get the submission #}
{% set submission = craft.formie.submissions.id(1234).one() %}

{# Loop through each field in the field layout #}
{% for field in submission.getFieldLayout().getCustomFields() %}
    {% if not field.getIsCosmetic() %}
        {# Get the raw value for the field, from the submission #}
        {% set value = submission.getFieldValue(field.handle) %}

        <strong>{{ field.name }}</strong><br>
        {{ field.getValueForSummary(value, submission) }}
    {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

The result is very similar to getValueAsString(), the only real difference being that it supports rendering items in HTML. This can be helpful for Element or File Upload fields that render an anchor (<a>) element.

For export#

Similarly, we have a specific function for the values used when generating a CSV export of a form. A word of warning that some values are arrays, such as for Table, Repeater and Group fields, because these are designed to span over multiple columns in a CSV.

{# Get the submission #}
{% set submission = craft.formie.submissions.id(1234).one() %}

{# Loop through each field in the field layout #}
{% for field in submission.getFieldLayout().getCustomFields() %}
    {% if not field.getIsCosmetic() %}
        {# Get the raw value for the field, from the submission #}
        {% set value = submission.getFieldValue(field.handle) %}

        <strong>{{ field.name }}</strong><br>
        {{ field.getValueForExport(value, submission) }}
    {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

For integrations#

This is the more advanced of the "conversion" functions and is specifically for use with integrations, but you might find it useful for some use cases.

The difference with this function is that it handles converting values from a source format (the Formie field defines this) to the destination format (the integration defines this).

Say, for example, we want to map the values from a Checkboxes field to our Mailchimp integration. This process allows us to pick a custom field in Mailchimp to map the Formie field to. Now this destination field could be a text field, a checkboxes field or something else entirely. When the integration is run, we need to convert the array content from Formie into either a string or keep it as an array — all depending on the type of field we map to.

For this reason, we need to define what sort of destination format the value needs to be converted to.

{# Get the integration — some integrations have specific conversion logic #}
{% set integration = craft.formie.plugin.integrations.getIntegrationByHandle('mailchimp') %}

{# Get the raw value for the field #}
{% set value = submission.getFieldValue(field.handle) %}

{# Create an `IntegrationField` to act as the destination field #}
{% set integrationField = create({
    class: 'verbb\\formie\\models\\IntegrationField',
    type: 'string',
}) %}

{{ field.getValueForIntegration(value, integrationField, integration, submission) }}

The first difference is that we create a verbb\formie\models\IntegrationField model class. This acts as the setting for the destination field — essentially what we want to convert the value to. It's given a type, or which the following are available:

  • string
  • number
  • float
  • boolean
  • date
  • datetime
  • array

Because we've decided to convert it to a string, the origin Checkboxes field will convert the array value into a comma-delimited string.

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