Rendering Nodes #

You have two options for outputting your menu:

craft.navigation.render() #

The easy option - let Navigation output the list items for you. This will generate a nested <ul> list of navigation items. You can also pass in additional classes for each element.

{{ craft.navigation.render('navHandle', {
    ulClass: 'nav-items',
    liClass: 'nav-item',
    aClass: 'nav-link',
    activeClass: 'nav-active',
    ulAttributes: {
        'data-attr': 'Some value',
    },
    liAttributes: {
        'data-attr': 'Some value',
    },
    aAttributes: {
        'data-attr': 'Some value',
    },
}) }}

craft.navigation.nodes() #

For more fine-grained control over the navigation output, you can call nodes directly. As nodes are elements, output is a breeze using Craft's {% nav %} tag, so you don't have to deal with recursive macros.

Once you've mastered rendering your nodes, check out the Eager-Loading docs for performance gains.

{% set nodes = craft.navigation.nodes()
    .handle('mainMenu')
    .all() %}

{# Or - alternatively #}
{% set nodes = craft.navigation.nodes('mainMenu').all() %}

<ul>
    {% nav node in nodes %}
        <li>
            {{ node.link }}

            {% ifchildren %}
                <ul>
                    {% children %}
                </ul>
            {% endifchildren %}
        </li>
    {% endnav %}
</ul>

If you'd rather not use the {% nav %} functionality, you can create your own recursive macro to loop through nodes. In addition, you'll also only want to initially output the first level of nodes using the level: 1 parameter.

{% import _self as macros %}

{% set nodes = craft.navigation.nodes()
    .handle('mainMenu')
    .level(1)
    .all() %}

<ul>
    {% for node in nodes %}
        {{ macros.navigationNodes(node) }}
    {% endfor %}
</ul>

{% macro navigationNodes(node) %}
    {% import _self as macros %}

    <li>
        {{ node.link }}

        {% if node.hasDescendants %}
            <ul>
                {% for subnode in node.children %}
                    {{ macros.navigationNodes(subnode) }}
                {% endfor %}
            </ul>
        {% endif %}
    </li>
{% endmacro %}

Don't forget, that calling craft.navigation.nodes() means you're querying Nodes, so its a good idea to brush up on querying elements.

Custom rendering #

When looping through each node, you'll have access to all the attributes of a Node, and you have full control over what to show. Take a look at the following example, that the craft.navigation.render() function uses under the hood:

{% set nodes = craft.navigation.nodes('mainMenu').all() %}

<ul>
    {% nav node in nodes %}
        <li class="{% if node.classes | length %}{{ node.classes }}{% endif %}">
            <a {% if node.url %}href="{{ node.url }}"{% endif %} class="{% if node.active %}is-active{% endif %}"{% if node.newWindow %} target="_blank" rel="noopener"{% endif %} {% for attribute in node.customAttributes %}{{ attribute.attribute }}="{{ attribute.value }}"{% endfor %}>
                {{- node.title -}}
            </a>

            {% ifchildren %}
                <ul>
                    {% children %}
                </ul>
            {% endifchildren %}
        </li>
    {% endnav %}
</ul>

craft.navigation.getActiveNode() #

You can get the active node of any navigation through this tag. Often useful if you want to output an additional navigation area on your site that's contextual to the current node you're on.

You can also provide any of the normal query parameters you normally would with craft.navigation.nodes().

{# Represents a Node element #}
{% set activeNode = craft.navigation.getActiveNode({ handle: 'mainMenu' }) %}

<ul>
    {# Start looping through any nested nodes, starting at the currently active one #}
    {% set nodes = craft.navigation.nodes()
        .descendantOf(activeNode)
        .all() %}

    {% nav node in nodes %}
        <li>
            {{ node.title }}<br>
            {{ node.active }}<br>

            {% ifchildren %}
                <ul>
                    {% children %}
                </ul>
            {% endifchildren %}
        </li>
    {% endnav %}
</ul>

Do note that this will only match against the exact node matching the current URL. If you're on a child of a parent that matches as active, this function will not return the parent as being active.

To illustrate, take for example two URLs:

  • my-site.com/news
  • my-site.com/news/some-article

And the navigation included a node with the URL for /news (either a manual link, or linked to an entry element). You output the following in your templates:

{{ craft.navigation.getActiveNode({ handle: 'mainMenu' }) }}

If you were on the URL /news it would return that you're on the active node. If you were on /news/some-article it would return that this is not the active node. Navigation would be looking for a node with a URL that matches /news/some-article, and because it can't find one, it will not return an active page.

However, its common you'll want to highlight the News node as being active, if your site uses nested navigation. That way, it shows to your users that you're in the "News" section of the site. In this instance you can pass a second attribute to getActiveNode() to include child and parent matching. For example:

{{ craft.navigation.getActiveNode({ handle: 'mainMenu' }, true) }}

In this case, when you are on the URL /news, /news/some-article or any other URL that includes /news it would return that "News" is the active node.

Get started with Navigation

Available for Craft 3. Get it from the plugin store.